Post Work in Progress for Peer Review

Announcements


Welcome to Write It, the home for young writers. Post your works-in-progress and get feedback or give your opinion on your peers’ creative writing. Try a step-by-step writing workshop, then publish your writing online.

You’ve probably noticed we’ve made some changes to the boards! Find the boards for Underground Railroad historical fiction, Science Explorations, Scholastic News, and more right here.

Looking for our boards dedicated to favorite series, authors, and causes? You'll find them on THE THE STACKS. Head on over for the Buzz Board, Harry Potter, Save the Planet, Goosebumps, and more!
   [ 1 post ] Average score:  
Author Message
 Whoopie Pie Tug-of-War
regular_visitor

Joined: Mon Aug 23, 2010 1:21 pm
Posts: 115
Sat May 07, 2011 6:19 pm
       This is my first post on this board so I need lots of feedback!  Thanks!                                          
                                                
                                                        

                                                      Whoopie Pie Tug-of-War
    Almost everyone loves a good whoopie pie, the combination of two gooey, choco-
late inch-thick cookies, and a creamy vanilla filling in the middle.  This combo creates a very tempting snack.  It is best kept out of sight if you are trying to lose weight or cutting back on your sugar.
    The whoopie pie is best known in the northeastern United States, especially in Maine and Pennsylvania.  In some areas, they are called gobs but most people call them whoopie pies.  The name "whoopie pie" may have originated from when a young Amish woman checked her cakes in the oven and exclaimed " Whoopie!", but it is not certain.
    The tug-of-war between Maine and Pennsylvania began when a Maine State legislator introduced a bill to make the whoopie pie Maine's official state dessert. Later they changed it to official state treat.
     But when Lancaster County, Pennsylvania residents heard, they didn't agree one bit.  They said it was all baloney and that the whoopie pie was created by the area's Amish families. The Bird-in-Hand Bakery in Lancaster County makes pumpkin and red velvet whoopie pies besides the original chocolate.  John Smucker, CEO of the bakery, said, "We've had this thing with the whoopie pie here for years and years and decades.  And all of a sudden they try to enter the picture... it's just a bunch of nonsense."
     But Amos Orcutt, president of the Maine Whoopie Pie Association and the University of Maine Foundation, disagreed with John Smucker.  He said that, " A lot of alumni said, 'I remember these whoopie pies.' These are people who are eighty, ninety years old eating whoopie pies when they wre young."
     Not everyone in Maine thinks the whoopie pie would make a good state treat. Donald Pilon, a state representative from Saco, objects because of the large amounts of sugar and shortening used to make it. This makes it a rich, unhealthy snack when one-third of Maine's children are already obese. "Whoopie pie, it's not even a pie," he commented. "It's pieces of cake with frosting in the middle."
     On February 19, 2011, twenty-one-year-old Josh Graupera and some friends organized a rally of one hundred people in downtown Lancaster to protest the bill.  One person even carried a sign declaring, " Give me whoopie or give me death."
      " We thought we'd organize as many people as possible to stand up and say,' You're not going to take our heritage from us,' " Graupera explained. "This is Lancaster County tradition.  They can have their lobsters."
        Although the argument may seem a bit heated at times, both sides say it's all in good fun.                                              

Maine and Pennsylvania.  In some areas, they are called gobs but most people call

them whoopie pies.  The name "whoopie pie" may have originated from when a

young Amish woman checked her cakes in the oven and exclaimed " Whoopie!", but

it is not certain.\par
    The tug-of-war between Maine and Pennsylvania began when a Maine State

legislator introduced a bill to make the whoopie pie Maine's official state dessert.

Later they changed it to official state treat.
     But when Lancaster County, Pennsylvania residents heard, they didn't agree

one bit.  They said it was all baloney and that the whoopie pie was created by the

area's Amish families. The Bird-in-Hand Bakery in Lancaster County makes

pumpkin and red velvet whoopie pies besides the original chocolate.  John

Smucker, CEO of the bakery, said, "We've had this thing with the whoopie pie

here for years and years and decades.  And all of a sudden they try to enter the

picture... it's just a bunch of nonsense."
     But Amos Orcutt, president of the Maine Whoopie Pie Association and the

University of Maine Foundation, disagreed with John Smucker.  He said that, " A

lot of alumni said, 'I remember these whoopie pies.' These are people who are

eighty, ninety years old eating whoopie pies when they wre young."
     Not everyone in Maine thinks the whoopie pie would make a good state treat.

Donald Pilon, a state representative from Saco, objects because of the large

amounts of sugar and shortening used to make it. This makes it a rich, unhealthy

snack when one-third of Maine's children are already obese. "Whoopie pie, it's

not even a pie," he commented. "It's pieces of cake with frosting in the

middle."
     On February 19, 2011, twenty-one-year-old Josh Graupera and some friends

organized a rally of one hundred people in downtown Lancaster to protest the bill.

 One person even carried a sign declaring, " Give me whoopie or give me death."


      " We thought we'd organize as many people as possible to stand up and say,'

You're not going to take our heritage from us,' " Graupera explained. "This is

Lancaster County tradition.  They can have their lobsters."
        Although the argument may seem a bit heated at times, both sides say it's all

in good fun.



Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
 
   [ 1 post ] Average score:  


PRS © 2008 PRS Team